Entries

物流のしくみ (5) 消費 


◇ 語り手:  Annie Leonard アニー・レオナード
◇ 日本語字幕制作者:  indiesatellite
◇ 英語字幕つきの動画を見るには こちら で「English」 を選択し、画面上端に
   並んでいるアイコンの左から5番目 「Consumption」 をクリックして下さい。



The Story of Stuff (5) ・・・ Consumption     
      物の物語 (5)
 ・・・ 消費
    (和訳: ゆうこ)

 和訳は、1行ごとの意訳になっています。
   個々の英単語の意味を手早く調べたい場合は こちら をクリックしてください。
   単語の上にマウスカーソルを合わせるだけで意味が表示されるようになります。


And that brings us to the golden arrow of consumption.
そこでおつぎは黄金の矢印、消費です。

This is the heart of the system, the engine that drives it.
それがこのシステムの中心であり、全体を動かしている動力です。

It is so important that protecting this arrow has become the top priority for both of these guys.
政府と企業にとって、この矢印を護ることはあまりにも重要なので、最優先事項になっています。

That is why, after 9/11, when our country was in shock,
だからこそ、9/11事件で国中がショックの只中にあった時

and President Bush could have suggested any number of appropriate things:
ブッシュ大統領が国民に呼びかけたことは、「悼みを」でも「祈りを」でも「希望を」でもなく、

to grieve, to pray, to hope. NO. He said to shop. TO SHOP?!
「ショッピングをしよう」 だったんです。――こともあろうにショッピングとは!

We have become a nation of consumers. Our primary identity has become that of being consumers,
米国は、消費者国家になってしまっています。私たちの基本的な身分は「消費者」になってしまっています。

not mothers, teachers, farmers, but consumers.
母親や、教師や、農民であるより先に、消費者なんです。

The primary way that our value is measured and demonstrated
そこでは、人の価値を測るにも、自分の価値を示すにも、

is by how much we contribute to this arrow, how much we consume. And do we!
この矢印にどれだけ寄与したか、どれだけ消費をしたかが基準になります。だから私たちは

We shop and shop and shop. Keep the materials flowing. And flow they do!
買って、買って、買いまくるんです。物を流しつづけよう――ええ、流れてますとも!

Guess what percentage of total materials flow through this system
このシステムの流れにのって北米で販売された品物のうち、いったい何割が

is still in product or use 6 months after their date of sale in North America?
6ヵ月後にもまだ生産や使用をされつづけてると思います?

Fifty percent? Twenty? NO. One percent. One! In other word, 99 percent of the stuff
半分? 2割? ――とんでもない。1%です、たったの1%ですよ! ということは

we harvest, mine, process, transport—99 percent of the stuff we run through this system
このシステムを通して収穫され、採掘され、製品化され、輸送されてきた品物のうち、99%が

is trashed within 6 months. Now how can we run a planet
半年以内にゴミになってるんですよ。こんなことを続けていて

with that level of materials throughput? It wasn’t always like this.
どうして地球を維持していけるでしょう? 一昔前は、こうじゃなかったんです。

The average U.S. person now consumes twice as much as they did 50 years ago.
今の平均的アメリカ人は、50年前の2倍の消費をしています。

Ask your grandma. In her day, stewardship and resourcefulness and thrift were valued.
おばあちゃんに聞いてみてください。昔は家計管理や、生活の知恵や、倹約を大事にしたものです。

So, how did this happen? Well, it didn’t just happen. It was designed.
じゃあ、今みたいになったのはなぜ? 独りでになったんじゃありません。仕組まれたんです。

Shortly after the World War 2, these guys were figuring out how to ramp up the economy.
第2次世界大戦が終わってすぐの頃、政府と企業は経済を上向きにする方策を練っていました。

Retailing analyst Victor Lebow articulated the solution
そのとき小売分析家ヴィクター・レボーが断言した解決法が

that has become the norm for the whole system.
システム全体の基準になったんです。彼が言うには、

He said: “Our enormously productive economy demands that we make consumption our way of life,
「経済がこれほど生産的になってきたからには、消費を我々の生き方の根本にする必要があります。

that we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfaction,
商品の購入と使用を、儀式のように習慣的なものにして、我々の精神的な満足も、現世的な満足も、

our ego satisfaction, in consumption.
消費の中に求めるようにするのです。

We need things consumed, burned up, replaced and discarded at an ever-accelerating rate.”
我々は、物をどんどん消費し、焼き尽くし、取り替え、捨てていかねばなりません」

President Eisenhower’s Council of Economic Advisors Chairman said
アイゼンハワー大統領の経済諮問委員会の議長は、こう言いました。

that “The American economy’s ultimate purpose is to produce more consumer goods.”
「アメリカ経済の究極の目的は、もっと大量の消費物資を生産することであります」

MORE CONSUMER GOODS?
もっと大量の消費物資ですって?

Our ultimate purpose? Not provide health care, or education, or safe transportation,
それが究極の目的なの? 医療対策でもなく、教育対策でもなく、交通安全対策でもなく?

or sustainability or justice? Consumer goods?
環境保護でも、正義の護持でもなく? 消費物資?

How did they get us to jump on board this program so enthusiastically?
彼らはどうやって私たちをそれほど熱心にこのプログラムに飛びつかせたのでしょう?

Well, two of their most effective strategies are planned obsolescence and perceived obsolescence.
彼らの策略のうち、いちばん効果があったのは、「計画的な老朽化」 と 「心理的な老朽化」 でした。

Planned obsolescence is another word for “designed for the dump.”
「計画的な老朽化」 というのは、「捨てさせるように設計する」 ことです。

It means they actually make stuff to be useless as quickly as possible
つまり、できるだけ早く役立たなくなるような製品を作って

so we will chuck it and buy a new one.
私たちに捨てさせ、また別のを買わせるのです。

It’s obvious with things like plastic bags and coffee cups, but now it”s even big stuff:
ポリ袋やコーヒーカップはもちろんのこと、今ではもっと大きな物も、使い捨てになっています。

mops, DVDs, cameras, barbeques even, everything! Even computers.
モップ、DVD、カメラ、バーベキューのコンロ、何もかも。パソコンさえもです。

Have you noticed that when you buy a computer now,
お気づきでしょうか――新しいパソコンを買っても

the technology is changing so fast that in just a couple of years,
技術の進歩が早いので、ほんの2年かそこらで

it’s actually an impediment to communication? I was curious about this
コミュニケーションに障害が出てしまうんですね。私はそのことに興味がわいたので

so I opened up a big desktop computer to see what was inside. And I found out
デスクトップのパソコンを開けて、中を調べてみたんです。それでわかったんですが、

that the piece that changes each year is just a tiny little piece in the corner.
年ごとに変わる部分というのは、隅っこにある小さな部品1つだけなんです。

But you can’t just change that one piece, because each new version is a different shape,
でも、その部品だけ交換するというわけにはいかない。なぜかというと、年ごとに形が違うからです。

so you gotta chuck the whole thing and buy a new one.
だから、パソコン一台まるごと捨てて、新しいのを買うしかない。

So, I was reading industrial design journals from 1950s when planned obsolescence
1950年代に出版された工業デザインの雑誌を読んだんですが、「計画的な老朽化」 が

was really catching on. These designers are so open about it.
流行りだした頃、工業デザイナーたちは、驚くほど開けっぴろげに

They actually discuss how fast can they make stuff break
語り合ってるんですね。どうやったら製品がもっと壊れやすくなり、

that still leaves the consumer having enough faith in the product
しかも製品に対する消費者の信用は失わないで、

to go out and buy another one. It was so intentional!
また別の品を買わせることができるかを。完全に計画的なんです。

But stuff cannot break fast enough to keep this arrow afloat,
でも製品は、購買者を途切れさせないほど早く壊れるものではありません。

so there’s also “perceived obsolescence.”
そこで施されるのが、「心理的な老朽化」 です。

Now perceived obsolescence convinces us to throw away stuff that is still perfectly useful.
「心理的な老朽化」 は、全く壊れていない物を、私たちが捨てるように仕向けます。

How do they do that? Well, they change the way stuff looks
どうやって? それはね、製品の概観を次々に変えていき、

so if you bought your stuff a couple years ago,
もし誰かの持ち物が2年前の製品だったら

everyone can tell that you haven’t contributed to this arrow recently
その人は最近、消費の流れに寄与してないということが、皆にわかるようにするんです。

and since the way we demonstrate our value is contributing to this arrow, it can be embarrassing.
そうすると、消費の流れにどれだけ寄与したかで価値を測られるこの社会では、世間体が悪くなります。

Like I’ve have had the same fat white computer monitor
たとえば私は、大きな図体の、白いパソコン・モニターを、机の上で

on my desk for 5 years. My co-worker just got a new computer.
5年間使っています。でも私の同僚は、新しいパソコンを買ったばかり。

She has a flat, shiny, sleek monitor.
モニターは、薄くて光沢があり、スマートです。

It matches her computer, it matches her phone, even her pen stand.
それは彼女のパソコンによく似合い、電話にも、ペン立てにも似合っています。

She looks like she is driving in space ship central and I,
彼女はまるで宇宙船の操縦士みたい。それに比べて、この私は

I look like I have a washing machine on my desk.
まるで机の上に洗濯機を置いてるみたいなんです。

Fashion is another prime example of this. Have you ever wondered why women’s shoe heels
もう一つの良い例は、ファッションです。考えてみたことありますか? どうして女性用の靴のヒールは

go from fat one year to go skinny the next to fat to skinny? It is not because there is some debate
年ごとに細くなったり太くなったりを繰り返すのかを。その理由は、女性の足にはどういうヒールが最も健康的か

about which heel structure is the most healthy for women’s feet. It’s because wearing fat heels
という争論があるせいではありません。単にそれは、細いヒールが流行っている年に太いヒールの靴を

in a skinny heel year shows everybody that you haven’t contributed to that arrow recently
履いていると、最近その人は消費の流れに貢献していないということが皆にわかってしまい、

so you’re not as valuable as that person in skinny heels next to you,
まわりの人よりも価値がない、と思わせるようにするためです。

or, more likely, in some ad. It’s to keep us buying new shoes.
さらには、コマーシャルと比べさせて、新しい靴を買わせるためです。

Advertisements, and media in general, play a big role in this.
様々な広告や、メディア全般が、このことに大きな役を果たしています。

Each of us in the U.S. is targeted with over 2,000 advertisements a day.
米国に住む人は、一日に2000種以上もの広告にさらされています。

We each see more advertisements in one year than people 50 years ago saw in lifetime.
私たちが一年間に見る広告の数は、50年前の人が一生の間に見たのよりも多くなっています。

And if you think about it, what is the point of an ad except to make us unhappy with what we have?
そのことを考えてみれば、広告は、私たちに不足感を抱かせるためにあるのだということがわかるでしょう?

So, 3,000 times a day, we’re told that our hair is wrong, our skin is wrong,
広告は、1日3000回も私たちに言います。あなたの髪が良くない、肌が良くない、

our clothes are wrong, our furniture is wrong, our cars are wrong, we are wrong
服装が良くない、家具が良くない、車が良くない、あなたそのものが良くない、

but that it can all be made right if we just go shopping.
でも買い物しさえすれば何もかもうまくいくよ――と。

Media also helps by hiding all of this and all of this,
メディアもまた、採取、製造、廃棄に関するすべてを隠し、

so the only part of the materials economy we see is the shopping.
物質経済の全過程の中で、私たちが目にするのはショッピングだけになっています。

The extraction, production and disposal all happen outside our field of vision.
採取や、製造や、廃棄は、私たちの視界の外側で行なわれてるんです。

So, in the U.S. we have more stuff than ever before,
そのため、米国では皆、かつてないほど物を持っているのに

but poll show that our national happiness is actually declining.
世論調査によれば、国民全体の幸福度は下がってきています。

Our national happiness peaked in the 1950s, the same time as this consumption mania exploded.
国民全体の幸福度がピークだったのは1950年代で、これはちょうど消費への熱狂が沸き起こった時期でした。

Hmmm. Interesting coincidence.
これは偶然の一致とは思えませんね。

I think I know why. We have more stuff,
それはこうだと思います。持ち物は増えても、

but we have less time for the things that really make us happy:
自分を本当に幸せにするものの為に使う時間が減ってるんです。

friends, family, leisure time. We’re working harder than ever.
仕事に追われて、友だちや、家族や、趣味の為の時間が減ってきてる。

Some analysts say that we have less leisure time than in Feudal Society.
ある分析によれば、現代は、暇な時間が封建時代よりも少ないんだそうです。

And do you know what the two main activities are
それで、そのわずかしかない暇な時間に

that we do with the scant leisure time we have?
私たちがやっている主な活動は、何だかわかりますか?

Watch TV and shop.
テレビ視聴とショッピングです。

In U.S., we spend 3 to 4 times as many hours shopping
私たち米国人は、ヨーロッパ人の3、4倍の時間を

as our counterparts in Europe do. So we are in this ridiculous situation
ショッピングに使っています。だから、私たちの毎日はと言うと、

where we go to work, maybe two jobs even, and we come home and we’re exhausted
仕事に行って、それも、2つかけもちの仕事だったりして、帰宅するとくたくたに疲れていて、

so we plop down on our new couch and watch TV and the commercials tell us “YOU SUCK”
買ったばかりのソファに倒れこんでテレビを見て、コマーシャルに何から何までダメと言われて、

so we gotta go to the mall to buy something to feel better, and then you gotta go to work more
気を取り直すためにショッピングセンターに行って買い物をして、その支払いのために

to pay for the stuff you just bought so you come home and you’re more tired
もっといっぱい働かなければならなくなって、帰宅するともっと疲れていて、

so you sit down and watch more T.V, and it tells you to go to the mall again
へたりこんでテレビを見ると、またショッピングセンターに行って来いと言われて、

and we’re on this crazy work-watch-spend treadmill and we could just stop.
狂ったような 「仕事→テレビ→買い物」 の悪循環です。止めればいいだけなのに。

物の物語 (6) ・・・ 廃棄 につづく)

0件のコメント

コメントの投稿

投稿フォーム
投稿した内容は管理者にだけ閲覧出来ます

Appendix

プロフィール

 ゆうこ

Author: ゆうこ
プロフィールはHPに記載しています。
HP ⇒ 絵本・翻訳・原始意識
ブログ① ⇒YouTube 動画で覚えよう 英語の歌
ブログ② ⇒心/身体/エコロジー
ブログ③ ⇒歌の古里
ブログ④ Inspiration Library

新着記事

最近のコメント

FC2カウンター